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Rose-Marie Answers French Vogue's Questions

December 12, 2011

Rose-Marie Answers French Vogue's Questions


If you saw Rose-Marie's coverage in the Winter edition of French Vogue, then you know how important health and natural ingredients are to this makeup artist. Read further for more of the interview that wasn't published! Q. Do you feel like these last years the dermatologic and surgical trend among celebrities has switched to a more natural look? Considering the new sexy seniors (Jane Fonda, Lauren Hutton, Jacqueline Bisset...) who are willing to display some winkles in order to appear more "real," do you agree that women want to look their age--only enhanced, healthy and not a different, allegedly younger or prettier self? A. The truth is...Hollywood was rejecting actresses that were having obvious enhancement procedures. The perceptions many actresses had of themselves were getting so distorted that it was starting to affect their acting ability. Botox was getting in the way of showing expressions. The pressure to be young and sexy was damaging their confidence, leading to facelifts and breast enhancement. This rejection was a great reality check for many of them because they had no choice but to calm it down or not work. Thank goodness for that because it back-tracked to more natural looking actresses, setting in place a change in mindset or thinking twice before over-doing facial procedures and to start healing oneself from within. Jane Fonda used exercise, Lauren Hutton exudes natural self confidence and Jacqueline Bisset is a natural beauty. One woman in particular who has aged with grace and holds her own is Helen Mirren Q. Do you think that women still feel some pressure from their professional environment to seek harsher "youth dermatologic treatments" like injections, ultra-sound skin tightening, lasers or even light surgical procedures? A. I think there are two kinds of women and there will always be, no matter what: the "naturals" and the "enhanced." Some women will let the pressure of a job or aging affect them deeply to the point where they feel there is no other alternative but to go for the next quick fix. Anything to stop the aging clock. The other half will just have the confidence and intelligence to know better and be content with who they are. Q. What's your take on these technologies? What could you do or definitely never do? Where do you draw the line? Do you think you could change your mind one day? A. I am not a fan really of any of it. Botox to me is an absolute NO. I have been saying for years there will be repercussions on how the Botox decides to manifest itself later in the body. I believe this will eventually lead to disease. Our bodies' detox avenues are completely over burdened by the onslaught of chemicals and pollutants in the air we breathe, the water we drink and the food we eat. The biggest wake-up call in the beauty business is for them to acknowledge that whatever is applied to the skin is absorbed. Now with the new nano-particles being introduced into cosmetics/procedures, we are even in greater danger of these questionable ingredients being absorbed into the blood stream and passing through the blood-brain barrier. I am also too scared to have surgery as I have seen so many bad face lifts, bad breast implants, bad nose jobs, bad lipo suction and bad lip jobs that I refuse to even go there. I don't mind aging at all. People will laugh if I told them that I have just started to get facials in the last year as I never had the urge to have all those chemical products (that are slowly being exposed as questionable and some even finally being banned….i.e., phylates and parabens) smeared all over my face. Q. Are you against the idea of combining harsh dermatologic treatment like invasive lasers and organic products like your own line? Or do you think it is a nonsense, that being organic is a radical, non-compromising lifestyle? A. I am glad you asked that question. Actually, I believe that if you decide to do these procedures, at least heal your skin later with organic, pure, beauty products. Quality, of course, is important, as organic products can be drug store grade, and it can be high-end department store grade. I have a new oil called RMS Beauty Oil, which is made with some pretty remarkable herbal extracts and oils that are high in fatty acids and antioxidants. Great for the skin under most of these circumstances. I would prefer and suggest these types of products for after-treatment over most brands blindly recommended by dermatologists. Organic products that have kept their integrity and are made with healing ingredients much superior in helping one’s skin in most of these cases, and I find it sad to look at the ingredients of the recommended brands for after-care that these doctors push with absolute no knowledge of the ingredients. Not good. Traditional beauty products have what I call "dead" ingredients. Dead ingredients can't interact synergistically with skin; only real, natural (anything alive) ingredients interact. The cosmetic industry uses an assortment of penetration enhancers to unnaturally get into the big soup of chemicals and synthetics. Laser procedures I am a little hesitant on because I have seen some problems on the models that have had this done, but in all honesty I do not know enough about this procedure. Q. Do you have the feeling that there is a cultural difference between what is usually accepted in terms of aesthetic correction between US and Europe? Between the West Coast and East Coast? A. Americans go overboard on everything, and I think so many want a quick fix in the beauty/age/weight/health department. I do think, however, that the west coast is a little too excessive in the work that they get done compared to the east coast. Europe in general seems to be much more at peace with how they look. Australia I feel is way ahead in accepting their beauty as is and just aim for health and well-being.

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